Research Papers in Statistics, New York: Wiley

Research Papers in Statistics, edited by F.N. David, John Wiley and Sons, 1966.
In 1926 Neyman continued his postdoctoral studies, spending the academic year in Paris with the support of a Rockefeller Fellowship. The next year he returned to Poland and assumed his position as faculty docent at the University of Warsaw. He also worked diligently to establish a small biometric laboratory at the Nencki Institute for Experimental Biology. Although his fame as a mathematician and statistician eventually placed him among the elite of the academic world, he was never offered a full professorship in Poland, and his economic situation in Poland proved precarious. In "The Neyman-Pearson Story: 1926-1934," an article in Research Papers in Statistics (1966), Egon Pearson quotes Neyman from a personal letter, dated June 23, 1932: "I simply cannot work; the crisis and the struggle for existence takes all my time and energy. I am not sure that next year I shall not be obliged to take some job, I do not know where—in trade, perhaps, selling coal or handkerchiefs."
Research papers in statistics.
I joined the Department of Bioinformatics & Biostatistics in July 2012 as the chair and a tenured full professor. Previously I was a full professor and the graduate coordinator in Mathematical Sciences at Clemson University where I started my career as an assistant professor in 1988. I have published numerous refereed research papers in statistics journals. Some of my research has been supported by the NIH, ONR and the NSF. David, ed., Research Papers in Statistics,Research papers in Statistics or allied disciplinesin Research Papers in Statistics, F
Meier was well known among his colleagues for co-developing a statistical method called the Kaplan-Meier estimator, which provided a novel method for estimating survival rates in clinical trial data. It incorporates data from patients who have been followed until death, as well as others who survived. The journal article that introduced the method in 1958, co-authored by Meier and Edward L. Kaplan, remains one of the most-cited research papers in statistics or any other field, with about 34,000 citations to date. Meier was well known among his colleagues for co-developing a statistical method called the Kaplan-Meier estimator, which provided a novel method for estimating survival rates in clinical trial data. It incorporates data from patients who have been followed until death, as well as others who survived. The that introduced the method in 1958, co-authored by Meier and Edward L. Kaplan, remains one of the most cited research papers in statistics or any other field, with about 34,000 citations to date. He is author of more than 30 research papers in Statistics, Econometrics and Actuarial Science published in international scientific journals including a paper that generalises the classical Kalman filter algorithm (Journal of the American Statistical Association (1986)). He is also co-author of Introductory Statistics with Applications in General Insurance, which was awarded the Clarence A. Kulp prize by the American Risk and Insurance Association (1985).